Home / Collections / ALL PRODUCTS / Bismuth Citrate (Specifically Designed)

Bismuth Citrate (Specifically Designed)

$87.00
Bismuth Citrate (Specifically Designed)

Bismuth Citrate (Specifically Designed)

$87.00
Details

Combats:

H2S - GERD - ACID REFLUX

This has been formulated for by Fords Pharmacy (our local compounding pharmacy). This compound will bind to H2S in the gut and prevent it from being absorbed in the body and causing issues such as gas and bloating. The dosage is 250mg tablets twice a day. Bismuth citrate may cause a temporary and harmless darkening of the stool. This is normal. 

An interesting Study: 

The predominant sulfur-containing gas produced by human colonic bacteria is hydrogen sulfide, and this compound appears to be one of the main malodorous agents in human flatus.  Moreover, H2S has a toxicity on the same order as cyanide, and Roediger et al.  and other investigators have carried out studies  suggesting that excessive sulfide production may play a pathogenic role in ulcerative colitis (UC).  In support of this theory, we recently found that fecal H2S release is greater in subjects with UC.

Thus, reduction of colonic H2S production clearly could have clinical utility in the reduction of odor and could be important in the treatment of colonic inflammatory disease.
Theoretically, several different therapeutic maneuvers might be used to decrease fecal H2S production. Although antibiotic therapy might eliminate the bacteria responsible for H2S production, such therapy could be associated with bacterial resistance and/or the overgrowth of pathogens. Reduction of the delivery of sulfur-containing compounds to the colon could also limit H2S production. However, a variety of endogenous compounds (e.g., mucin and taurocholic acid) as well as dietary substances (e.g., amino acids and sulfate) serve as sources of sulfur for the colonic bacteria,  and it seems unlikely that delivery of sulfur to the colon can be drastically reduced.
A simple approach to reducing H2S release in the colon would be the administration of a compound that binds H2S. In the test tube, bismuth reacts with sulfide to form very insoluble bismuth sulfide. In the present report, we carried out a series of experiments in rats and humans to determine whether bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) decreases the fecal release of H2S.